Mawgan Porth

Mawgan Porth is backed by sand dunes, photo by Keith Riley
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Mawgan Porth is backed by sand dunes, photo by Keith Riley

Mawgan Porth beach has fine white sand, pretty pools amidst the rocks and a stream running through it.The surf here is just right for first-time surfers, and the surf-school on the beach will help you ride the glorious waves. Mawgan Porth lies in the valley of Lanherne and the beach and its dunes are sandwiched between imposing cliffs and caves on either side.
If you enjoy walking the six mile coast path walk from Newquay to Mawgan Porth is exhilarating and you can catch the bus to return back to Newquay.

Ken Langmaid, a Newquay-born resident wrote:

The beach is a long one particularly at low water and there is an extent of sandhills and dry sand but not enough to prevent overcrowding during the season. It is a long walk from the sandhills to the sea at low tide, but there are plenty of spots along the north side of the bay where one may picnic below the cliffs within easy reach of the sea. Halfway along this side a path comes down from the village of Trenance which has a shop and a licensed hotel. There are also cafes and shops at the other end of the beach.

Coastpath sign at Mawgan Porth by Keith Riley
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Coastpath sign at Mawgan Porth by Keith Riley

The cliff walks are grand – north to Bedruthan Steps and south to Watergate. Mawgan Porth is at the mouth of a finely shaped valley which is walkable by footpath (Windsor footpath) to St Mawgan and further afield through the lovely Carnanton Woods. This is the famous Vale of Lanherne. A second though less spectacular valley joins the Vale of Lanherne a short distance above Porth.

A couple of hundred of feet up the northern edge you can trace the course of an old canal which was intended to transport sand to inland farms. Between the two valleys is a narrow ridge with a road to St Columb. At Gluvian are the remains of an old chapel. From here to Mawgan Porth caravans are much in evidence, especially on the sandy turf which borders the marshy valley floor. Excavations hereabouts have shown that this was a favoured one even in prehistoric times.